26virtual Moscow, My First Half-marathon avatar
ᜌᜓᜃᜒ (雪亮 | 스노 | Yuki)
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My first half marathon. Run/walk. Originally planned for 17 km only but the remaining kilometers were enough to get back home.

This was also for 26virtual:moscow race.

26virtual:moscow race My First Half-marathon (21.1 km), post-run

My first half marathon. Run/walk. Originally planned for 17 km only but the remaining kilometers were enough to get back home. This was also for 26virtual:moscow race.

26virtual:moscow race My First Half-marathon (21.1 km), post-runby I’M YourOnly.One is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 International.
Location: Metro Manila, Philippines | Date: 2020-09-22

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ᜌᜓᜃᜒ (Yuki ・ 雪亮)If this is not the end of oblivion, then I shall live everyday as if my life were to end this very day.

The YOOki (柳紀 ・ 유 기) Chronicles

The YOOki (柳紀 ・ 유 기) Chronicles is ᜌᜓᜃᜒ (Yuki ・ 雪亮)’s return into casual and personal blogging. The name “YOOki” is a mash-up of the acronym of YourOnly.One and my nickname ᜌᜓᜃᜒ (Yuki ・ 雪亮).

Interestingly, according to Chinese legend, 「柳」 (YOO) is an ancient Chinese surname. The ancestors of the surname were closely linked with the ancient sage-king named Yu Shun. In Korea, the 「유」 (YOO) lineage traces to the Xia, Han, and Joseon dynasties. Holders of the surname Yu or Yoo had a reputation for charity and diligence.1

It is also the word for “willow” or the “willow tree” which means graceful or slender; and a tree growing near a body of water which provide continuous nourishment and resources for everyone. It can also mean to exist, an oil (anointment(?)), and simply as “U” (you).

The hanzi 「紀」 (ki) character means to record, be disciplined, provide order. While the hangul equivalent, 「기」 (ki; gi), means energy, spirit, a banner, and a period of time; and is also a suffix used to make a gerund or an infinitive.

Can you guess what I mean by 「柳紀」 and 「유 기」 as the Chinese and Korean for “YOOki”?

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